bestandsaufnahm_gurlitt_duncan_ballantyn
bestandsaufnahm_gurlitt_duncan_ballantyn

Waterloo Bridge, 1903, Claude Monet. Photo: David Ertl, © Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland GmbH

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bestandsaufnahme_gurlitt_duncan_ballanty
bestandsaufnahme_gurlitt_duncan_ballanty

Das Christuskind mit dem Johannesknaben , 1540, Lucas Cranach der Jüngere. Photo: Mick Vincenz © Kunst- und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland GmbH.

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Cornelius Gurlitt: Nazi Art Loot and its Consequences

Soho House commissioned a review of ”Bestandsaufnahme Gurlitt” at Martin Gropius Bau – the inventory of illegal artworks found in the possession of Cornelius Gurlitt. Including interviews with the curators and directors, press conference coverage and a breakdown of its most intriguing art discoveries.

“Had it not been for the persistence of two  custom officials, one of the most important discoveries of Nazi looted art may never have come into public ownership. It started in 2010, when two officers began questioning an elderly man on a train travelling from Zurich to Munich. Taken aback by his nervous response to their questioning, they searched him and found an envelope containing €9,000 in brand new €500 notes. The man in question, Cornelius Gurlitt, a 79-year old recluse, told the officials that he was returning from selling an artwork to a gallery in Bern…"